LesRobotsMusicCartePostale (via)
Oskar, Ernest & Anatole

(Un)related: In researching Les “Robots Music,” I came across this — The Great Pianola War of 1898, a battle between concert pianist Mark Hambourg & “the future Mrs. Ziegfeld,” comedienne Anna Held. Hambourg detailed it in his autobiography:
“One of my fellow guests in the Hotel Martin, was Anna Held, the musical comedy actress, reputed to have the finest bare back in the world. She complained to the manager that I started practising too early in the morning, and disturbed her slumbers. As her habit was to stay up all night giving parties and dancing in her apartment which certainly disturbed me, I was indignant at her daring to complain of my noise. But the creature hired a pianola and made it play exactly the same pieces of music that I was working at, and with devilish ingenuity she would put on this wretched instrument whenever I started to practice. 
 “This nearly drove me distracted, and I was perforce obliged to stop playing. Eventually, however, through the good offices of Mr. Martin, we made a truce with each other, and I agreed not to start so early and she not to remain so late.”
Compromise! It rarely works in these disputes. You accept the noise, grudgingly. Or you move.

LesRobotsMusicCartePostale (via)

Oskar, Ernest & Anatole

(Un)related: In researching Les “Robots Music,” I came across this — The Great Pianola War of 1898, a battle between concert pianist Mark Hambourg & “the future Mrs. Ziegfeld,” comedienne Anna Held. Hambourg detailed it in his autobiography:

One of my fellow guests in the Hotel Martin, was Anna Held, the musical comedy actress, reputed to have the finest bare back in the world. She complained to the manager that I started practising too early in the morning, and disturbed her slumbers. As her habit was to stay up all night giving parties and dancing in her apartment which certainly disturbed me, I was indignant at her daring to complain of my noise. But the creature hired a pianola and made it play exactly the same pieces of music that I was working at, and with devilish ingenuity she would put on this wretched instrument whenever I started to practice.

“This nearly drove me distracted, and I was perforce obliged to stop playing. Eventually, however, through the good offices of Mr. Martin, we made a truce with each other, and I agreed not to start so early and she not to remain so late.”

Compromise! It rarely works in these disputes. You accept the noise, grudgingly. Or you move.