All day, every day.

(via)


Dan McManus and his service dog Shadow hang-glide together outside Salt Lake City, Utah, July 22, 2013. McManus suffers from anxiety and Shadow’s presence and companionship help him to manage the symptoms. The two have been flying together for about nine years with a specially made harness for Shadow.

The paws!

Dan McManus and his service dog Shadow hang-glide together outside Salt Lake City, Utah, July 22, 2013. McManus suffers from anxiety and Shadow’s presence and companionship help him to manage the symptoms. The two have been flying together for about nine years with a specially made harness for Shadow.

The paws!

Can relate.
TGIF and TG Moving Day is finally here so I can get this bitch over with!

Can relate.

TGIF and TG Moving Day is finally here so I can get this bitch over with!

Also? There’s a whale on the lawn.

Also? There’s a whale on the lawn.

(Source: reddpics.com)


 #CAN I HAVE A MOMENT OF YOUR TIME TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT OUR LORD AND SAVIOR SALAZAR SLYTHERIN

(via lecavaliers)

A wee little walker for a special needs duckling. Meet Frankie, the little duck that could! Brought to you by the amazing staff at the special needs department of Texas School for the Deaf.  Our science teacher, Connie Pottersnak, brought in live duck eggs in an incubator so that her students could witness the ducks hatch. When Frankie hatched, he couldn’t sit up without falling over. Once he fell over, he could not move himself back into an upright position.  The occupational and physical therapy department created a walker for Frankie. IT WORKED! Now, Frankie can flip himself into an upright position when he tips over.  

(via caninecharlie)

Genius!

Meet Ronan, a 3-year-old sea lion that loves disco and the Backstreet Boys, and is the first non-human mammal able to keep the beat to music

Previously, birds like parrots (like this parrot, and this parrot, and this parrot, and these parrots) were the prime head-bobbers of nature. And it’s not tied to vocals, like the way that parrots mimic human speech (since sea lions don’t do that). It seems like rhythm is a natural part of biology.

So next time you move, feel the beat in your evolution, man.

(via The Two-Way : NPR)

(via jtotheizzoe)


architectureofdoom:
A bear sits alone in a pit in an utterly depressing Kaliningrad zoo. 2001, by Peter Marlow

This makes me tear up.

architectureofdoom:

A bear sits alone in a pit in an utterly depressing Kaliningrad zoo. 2001, by Peter Marlow

This makes me tear up.

(Source: rajvagyok, via deszczowe-dni)

So, I came upon these little guys in a church parking lot when I was out walking this morning. They weren’t together when I found them, I originally thought there was only one. When I took this photo, I had already corralled them toward each other, since I thought they could use each other for warmth. They were shivering and moving very slow, crawling around making little noises. I looked for a mother or siblings but found none in the immediate area. I decided to bring them home and call wildlife rescue. I put them in my shirt pocket and they immediately curled up and went to sleep on the walk home.
When I got home, I found a box and put a heating pad in the bottom. Then I carefully removed my shirt, with the babies still in the pocket, and gently laid it on top of the pad. I called Austin Wildlife Rescue's hotline and spoke to a young woman who immediately asked me how big the possums were, from the tips of their tails to the ends of their noses — and I guessed about six inches. They were just a little bit bigger than mice. She said, “Oh, they're big enough to take care of themselves now. You can let them go. Or if you don't feel comfortable doing that, you can bring them here.” She also said they'd probably only recently fallen from their mother and even though they were moving slowly now, in a couple of days they'd be scampering around. “They already know everything they need to survive.”
I asked her if I had to take them back to the parking lot or if I could take them to a more secluded, wooded area and was told that would be fine, I could take them to another spot. I thanked her for her help.
It was still cool and windy outside so I decided to let the possums sleep for a while. A few hours later, after it had warmed up a bit, I took the box out into the woods behind where I live. I found a sunny area near a log and opened the box. They were both lying on top of my shirt looking up at me. They looked pretty comfy, like they had no interest in leaving their new bed, so I picked them up one by one and set them on the log. And I watched one take off into a pile of brush and the other one crawl into the log.
In retrospect, I wish I’d dressed them up in doll clothes and taken pictures.

So, I came upon these little guys in a church parking lot when I was out walking this morning. They weren’t together when I found them, I originally thought there was only one. When I took this photo, I had already corralled them toward each other, since I thought they could use each other for warmth. They were shivering and moving very slow, crawling around making little noises. I looked for a mother or siblings but found none in the immediate area. I decided to bring them home and call wildlife rescue. I put them in my shirt pocket and they immediately curled up and went to sleep on the walk home.

When I got home, I found a box and put a heating pad in the bottom. Then I carefully removed my shirt, with the babies still in the pocket, and gently laid it on top of the pad. I called Austin Wildlife Rescue's hotline and spoke to a young woman who immediately asked me how big the possums were, from the tips of their tails to the ends of their noses — and I guessed about six inches. They were just a little bit bigger than mice. She said, “Oh, they're big enough to take care of themselves now. You can let them go. Or if you don't feel comfortable doing that, you can bring them here.” She also said they'd probably only recently fallen from their mother and even though they were moving slowly now, in a couple of days they'd be scampering around. “They already know everything they need to survive.”

I asked her if I had to take them back to the parking lot or if I could take them to a more secluded, wooded area and was told that would be fine, I could take them to another spot. I thanked her for her help.

It was still cool and windy outside so I decided to let the possums sleep for a while. A few hours later, after it had warmed up a bit, I took the box out into the woods behind where I live. I found a sunny area near a log and opened the box. They were both lying on top of my shirt looking up at me. They looked pretty comfy, like they had no interest in leaving their new bed, so I picked them up one by one and set them on the log. And I watched one take off into a pile of brush and the other one crawl into the log.

In retrospect, I wish I’d dressed them up in doll clothes and taken pictures.

(via)

He seems delighted with himself, albeit a bit stuck.

First there was one…

First there was one…

In my pocket right now!

In my pocket right now!

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