Wait, Did This 15-Year-Old From Maryland Just Change Cancer Treatment?

His name is Jack Andraka, and he loves science and engineering with every inch of his 15-year-old soul. Just spend a minute or so watching this video. Seriously, do it now before you read more. Nothing from the Oscars or Grammys comes close to the unabashed excitement and joy of Andraka charging up to the stage to accept his $75,000 grand prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in May. This is the Olympics of youth science, with more than 1,500 entries from 70 countries competing, each of which already won their national competitions.

(via pulpatoon)

Art Forms of Nature – The Ernst Haeckel Collection

"Ernst Haeckel – philosopher, professor, physician, naturalist, biologist and artist. The pinnacle of his work – Art Forms of Nature - began publication in 1899 and is still an astonishing record of life on earth."

Rotate Your Owl For Science

Science!

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What Lives Inside Your Navel? An in-depth investigation of what lives inside the human belly button uncovers hundreds of organisms.

"[Our] closest relationships in life are with the mysterious, ultra-tiny organisms."They are partners more intimate than our lovers, children, pets or any other organisms," Dunn said. "You are covered in unknown life. That life is doing things for or to you. Don’t you feel like you should know about it?"

I’ve got an innie, which means my “belly button is home to at least 60 to 100 or more species of bacteria, fungi and yeasts, according to new research.”
You?
(Painting is via, a tumblr focused on belly button art, article via.)

What Lives Inside Your Navel? An in-depth investigation of what lives inside the human belly button uncovers hundreds of organisms.

"[Our] closest relationships in life are with the mysterious, ultra-tiny organisms.

"They are partners more intimate than our lovers, children, pets or any other organisms," Dunn said. "You are covered in unknown life. That life is doing things for or to you. Don’t you feel like you should know about it?"

I’ve got an innie, which means my “belly button is home to at least 60 to 100 or more species of bacteria, fungi and yeasts, according to new research.”

You?

(Painting is via, a tumblr focused on belly button art, article via.)

Pendulum Waves

Fifteen uncoupled simple pendulums of monotonically increasing lengths dance together to produce visual traveling waves, standing waves, beating, and (seemingly) random motion.

The period of one complete cycle of the dance is 60 seconds. The length of the longest pendulum has been adjusted so that it executes 51 oscillations in this 60 second period. The length of each successive shorter pendulum is carefully adjusted so that it executes one additional oscillation in this period. Thus, the 15th pendulum (shortest) undergoes 65 oscillations.

Um. Ooooooh, pretty!

(via)


topherchris:
If you didn’t realize it already, this world is completely insane.

You got that right!

topherchris:

If you didn’t realize it already, this world is completely insane.

You got that right!

(via topherchris)

BERKELEY — Engineers at UC Berkeley have developed a pressure-sensitive electronic material from semiconductor nanowires that could one day give new meaning to the term “thin-skinned.”"The idea is to have a material that functions like the human skin, which means incorporating the ability to feel and touch objects," said Ali Javey, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences and head of the UC Berkeley research team developing the artificial skin.The artificial skin, dubbed “e-skin” by the UC Berkeley researchers, is described in a Sept. 12 paper in the advanced online publication of the journal Nature Materials. It is the first such material made out of inorganic single crystalline semiconductors.A touch-sensitive artificial skin would help overcome a key challenge in robotics: adapting the amount of force needed to hold and manipulate a wide range of objects.
(more)

BERKELEY — Engineers at UC Berkeley have developed a pressure-sensitive electronic material from semiconductor nanowires that could one day give new meaning to the term “thin-skinned.”

"The idea is to have a material that functions like the human skin, which means incorporating the ability to feel and touch objects," said Ali Javey, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences and head of the UC Berkeley research team developing the artificial skin.

The artificial skin, dubbed “e-skin” by the UC Berkeley researchers, is described in a Sept. 12 paper in the advanced online publication of the journal Nature Materials. It is the first such material made out of inorganic single crystalline semiconductors.

A touch-sensitive artificial skin would help overcome a key challenge in robotics: adapting the amount of force needed to hold and manipulate a wide range of objects.

(more)

"There’s real poetry in the real world. Science is the poetry of reality."

Symphony of Science

Designers of a bra that turns into gas masks and a team who found that named cows produce more milk were among the winners of the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes.
Dr Elena Bodnar won the public health prize for the bra that, in an emergency, can be converted into two gas masks.
 
She demonstrated her invention and gave one to each of the Nobel laureates as a gift.
The peace prize went to a Swiss research team who determined whether it is better to be hit over the head with a full or empty bottle of beer.
"The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think. The prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual, honor the imaginative — and spur people’s interest in science, medicine, and technology.” Improbable Research

Designers of a bra that turns into gas masks and a team who found that named cows produce more milk were among the winners of the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes.

Dr Elena Bodnar won the public health prize for the bra that, in an emergency, can be converted into two gas masks.

She demonstrated her invention and gave one to each of the Nobel laureates as a gift.

The peace prize went to a Swiss research team who determined whether it is better to be hit over the head with a full or empty bottle of beer.

"The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think. The prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual, honor the imaginative — and spur people’s interest in science, medicine, and technology.” Improbable Research

Who will lift the giant?

This one weighs seven and a half thousand tons & spins like a ballerina. I cannot even comprehend.

The event began with little warning when a gentle gust of solar wind delivered a bundle of magnetic fields from the Sun to Earth. Like an octopus wrapping its tentacles around a big clam, solar magnetic fields draped themselves around the magnetosphere and cracked it open."The opening was huge—four times wider than Earth itself," says Wenhui Li, a space physicist at the University of New Hampshire who has been analyzing the data.He’s talking about a breach in the earth’s magnetic field, a breach ten times larger than anything previously thought to exist. Read why the next few years could be “lively” here.
(photo)

The event began with little warning when a gentle gust of solar wind delivered a bundle of magnetic fields from the Sun to Earth. Like an octopus wrapping its tentacles around a big clam, solar magnetic fields draped themselves around the magnetosphere and cracked it open.

"The opening was huge—four times wider than Earth itself," says Wenhui Li, a space physicist at the University of New Hampshire who has been analyzing the data.


He’s talking about a breach in the earth’s magnetic field, a breach ten times larger than anything previously thought to exist. Read why the next few years could be “lively” here.

(photo)

By coincidence, I just ran across this photo of a T4 bacteriophage — & he’s right! — it DOES look like that creepy squid. (See below.)
More micrographs here.

By coincidence, I just ran across this photo of a T4 bacteriophage — & he’s right! — it DOES look like that creepy squid. (See below.)

More micrographs here.

Researchers at the École Polytechnique de Montréal, in Canada, led by professor of computer engineering Sylvain Martel, have coupled live, swimming bacteria to microscopic beads to develop a self-propelling device, dubbed a nanobot. While other scientists have previously attached bacteria to microscopic particles to take advantage of their natural propelling motion, Martel’s team is the first to show that such hybrids can be steered through the body using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Dr. Martel, meet Dr. Bandyopadhyay.

Doesn’t manipulating e. coli & other bacteria to have immunities that they did not possess before just so they can produce something we need in a more cost-effective way have the potential to go terribly, horribly wrong? Or have I just read waaay too much science fiction?

Edited to add via duckandpenguin: You’ve probably read too much science fiction, but yeah, this has always been the major objection to genetically engineered organisms being used in the environment. In the lab it is easy to keep things under control, and things like genes jumping to wild populations doesn’t happen there.

Thanks! I feel better.

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