Company uses 3D printer to make models of fetuses

Expecting mothers who want their 4D sonograms taken to the next level can now get a life-size replica of their unborn baby.
‘Imagine holding your baby before he or she is born,’ the website for 3D Babies reads.

See also.

Company uses 3D printer to make models of fetuses

Expecting mothers who want their 4D sonograms taken to the next level can now get a life-size replica of their unborn baby.

‘Imagine holding your baby before he or she is born,’ the website for 3D Babies reads.

See also.

(Source: Boing Boing)

Taking 3D printing to a new level, a firm in Japan is offering expectant moms and dads the ability to purchase a 3D-printed model of their unborn child, for about $1200 USD.
The first few years of the social media revolution have been a golden age of tech utilitarianism, where maximizing users’ delight was considered, quite literally, the only currency that mattered. In Part II of the revolution, the desired currency is poised to change from attention to profit. That’s a shame. It doesn’t mean that the programs you love are anywhere close to coming to an end. It just means that things are about to get a little less awesome.

Why the Social Media Revolution Is About to Get a Little Less Awesome

Social media is about to get much more annoying, and it’s all Facebook’s fault (kinda.)

Drat.

Via Geekosystem: “Asimo can now mimic the motions of a human through a Kinect motion controller. This isn’t mere copying, though; the movements are tightly integrated to Asimo’s existing systems, allowing the robot to adjust his feet to keep him upright while following human movement.”

It’s uncanny, y’all.

Pregnancy Simulator - “Mommy Tummy”

Thank goodness for Japanese ingenuity.

(Source: uniquedaily.com)


We’re calling the Twitter API from Yahoo! Query Language, receiving an image URL for your avatar, converting it to a data:uri, and returning its base64-encoded value as JSON with a callback.Then we create an image on the client, load it with the data YQL gave us, and stretch it to fit our (comparatively very large) canvas tag.Since we’ve created the image locally, the usual canvas security restrictions don’t apply and we’re free to sample pixels. We do this, collecting color values and positions, and then we start drawing circles with random sizes and tiny random offsets from where each color sample was taken.

I don’t know what ANY of that means but the end result is pretty cool.
Twitter Avatar Portraits .:. kentbrewster.com
(via)

We’re calling the Twitter API from Yahoo! Query Language, receiving an image URL for your avatar, converting it to a data:uri, and returning its base64-encoded value as JSON with a callback.

Then we create an image on the client, load it with the data YQL gave us, and stretch it to fit our (comparatively very large) canvas tag.

Since we’ve created the image locally, the usual canvas security restrictions don’t apply and we’re free to sample pixels. We do this, collecting color values and positions, and then we start drawing circles with random sizes and tiny random offsets from where each color sample was taken.

I don’t know what ANY of that means but the end result is pretty cool.

Twitter Avatar Portraits .:. kentbrewster.com

(via)

Designers of a bra that turns into gas masks and a team who found that named cows produce more milk were among the winners of the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes.
Dr Elena Bodnar won the public health prize for the bra that, in an emergency, can be converted into two gas masks.
 
She demonstrated her invention and gave one to each of the Nobel laureates as a gift.
The peace prize went to a Swiss research team who determined whether it is better to be hit over the head with a full or empty bottle of beer.
"The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think. The prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual, honor the imaginative — and spur people’s interest in science, medicine, and technology.” Improbable Research

Designers of a bra that turns into gas masks and a team who found that named cows produce more milk were among the winners of the 2009 Ig Nobel prizes.

Dr Elena Bodnar won the public health prize for the bra that, in an emergency, can be converted into two gas masks.

She demonstrated her invention and gave one to each of the Nobel laureates as a gift.

The peace prize went to a Swiss research team who determined whether it is better to be hit over the head with a full or empty bottle of beer.

"The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think. The prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual, honor the imaginative — and spur people’s interest in science, medicine, and technology.” Improbable Research

ThinkGeek Bluetooth Retro Handset
"Okay, so apparently this Bluetooth stuff is named after a 10th century king of Denmark who enjoyed eating blueberries a bit too much, resulting in blue stained teeth. Harold "Bluetooth" Gormson helped to unite Sweden, Norway, and Denmark much like the way Bluetooth helps to unite your wireless gadgets under a single standard. And did we mention that the Bluetooth logo is composed of the rune characters representing his initials - H and B." — ThinkGeek
It’s nearly impossible not to be connected these days but I’d say I still manage to do a pretty good job of disappearing around this time every year. I haven’t watched the news since the morning of 12/12/08. What’d I miss?

ThinkGeek Bluetooth Retro Handset

"Okay, so apparently this Bluetooth stuff is named after a 10th century king of Denmark who enjoyed eating blueberries a bit too much, resulting in blue stained teeth. Harold "Bluetooth" Gormson helped to unite Sweden, Norway, and Denmark much like the way Bluetooth helps to unite your wireless gadgets under a single standard. And did we mention that the Bluetooth logo is composed of the rune characters representing his initials - H and B." — ThinkGeek

It’s nearly impossible not to be connected these days but I’d say I still manage to do a pretty good job of disappearing around this time every year. I haven’t watched the news since the morning of 12/12/08. What’d I miss?

Fan boards and support forums all have the same mantra saying that at 2:00 AM this morning, the Zune 30s reset on their own and doesn’t fully reboot.”

Hello, 2009!

ETA: Microsoft said that a leap year issue caused problems with the 30-gigabyte versions of its Zune digital music player. The statement followed a flood of online customer complaints about the devices freezing up. (via)

“We built our key duplication software system to show people that their keys are not inherently secret,” said Stefan Savage, the computer science professor from UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering who led the student-run project. “Perhaps this was once a reasonable assumption, but advances in digital imaging and optics have made it easy to duplicate someone’s keys from a distance without them even noticing.”

Ohhh. That’s why.

In one demonstration of the new software system, the computer scientists took pictures of common residential house keys with a cell phone camera, fed the image into their software which then produced the information needed to create identical copies. In another example, they used a five inch telephoto lens to capture images from the roof of a campus building and duplicate keys sitting on a café table about 200 feet away.


File this under ‘things I wish I didn’t know but glad I do.’

Researchers at the École Polytechnique de Montréal, in Canada, led by professor of computer engineering Sylvain Martel, have coupled live, swimming bacteria to microscopic beads to develop a self-propelling device, dubbed a nanobot. While other scientists have previously attached bacteria to microscopic particles to take advantage of their natural propelling motion, Martel’s team is the first to show that such hybrids can be steered through the body using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Dr. Martel, meet Dr. Bandyopadhyay.

"The Internet is not just changing the way people live but altering the way our brains work with a neuroscientist arguing this is an evolutionary change which will put the tech-savvy at the top of the new social order." (via)
Look out.
iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind
(via nu)

"The Internet is not just changing the way people live but altering the way our brains work with a neuroscientist arguing this is an evolutionary change which will put the tech-savvy at the top of the new social order." (via)

Look out.

iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind

(via nu)

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